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Female presentation skills AKICOLJ

Can anyone suggest some examples of women who are probably quite introverted (or at least quiet), who have good presentation skills?

(Ideally, supply links to YouTube clips!)


Context: I gave a presentation skills course yesterday, and used some examples of different styles of presentation, and - and this hadn't occurred to me before a female participant pointed it out - all my examples were male. This particular participant self-desctribed herself as an introvert, so I'd like to find some good presentation models for her. The best we could come up with on the day were Hilary Clinton, Fiona Bruce and Teresa May.

Comments

moniqueleigh
Aug. 9th, 2013 03:03 am (UTC)
acting is a way of concealing your true personality I suppose.

Nope. As an actor, I can tell you that the actor's personality is always, always, always part of the performance. It may not be an aspect that most people who know the actor off-stage know (or that the actor prefers to show), but it's always part of the actor. Many actors & acting teachers talk about how you have to be willing to drag your truest self out on stage. Plus, during an audition, unless you already have a relationship with the casting folks, your personality is all you have.
philmophlegm
Aug. 9th, 2013 09:05 am (UTC)
That's interesting - and not what I would have expected. Does that make it harder to play characters that you don't identify or at least sympathise with?
moniqueleigh
Aug. 10th, 2013 01:16 am (UTC)
It really does. :) Which is why most acting teachers/coaches/whatever tell their students that they have to find something within the character with which they can identify. Sometimes, it starts as simply as "my character's favourite colour/animal is the same as mine, and nobody who loves this colour/animal can be all bad." Then, of course, you have to build from that.

And, surprisingly, playing villains is actually fun once you realize that very, very few people see themselves as a villain. We're all the hero of our own story, and so it becomes a case of sorting out what the character is thinking/wanting underneath how it looks to the other characters & the audience.